NewspaperTree.com Blog

El Paso-centric info and commentary from the Center of North America

Rep. Reyes’ and UTEP’s Border Security Conference

From the NPT Inbox. This is important, as it has as much to do with the present and future of the El Paso-Juarez-Southern New Mexico borderplex as just about any other factor. There’s a lot of ways to slice this. In the meantime, here’s the confernece info:

6TH ANNUAL BORDER SECURITY CONFERENCE AUGUST 10-11

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Assistant to the President John Brennan, Assistant Secretary Alan Bersin, Assistant Secretary John Morton, U.S. Border Patrol Chief David Aguilar to join Chairman Silvestre Reyes August 10-11 at the University of Texas at El Paso

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano will participate in the 6th Annual Border Security Conference: Fostering a 21st Century Relationship of Cooperation and Shared Responsibility taking place August 10 – 11, 2009 at the University of Texas at El Paso. The Honorable John Brennan, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Alan Bersin, Assistant Secretary for International Affairs and Special Representative for Border Affairs, John Morton, Assistant Secretary for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Kenneth Melson, Director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, David Aguilar, Chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, and Roger Garner, USAID Mission Director for Mexico will also participate in this year’s conference. The event is free and open to the public.

“I am pleased that Secretary Napolitano and other high-ranking officials have accepted my invitation to come to El Paso,” Congressman Reyes said. “As the largest border community in the world, the El Paso/Juarez region is the ideal location to bring together top leaders from the U.S. and Mexico to address the many border security issues that continue to challenge communities such as ours. As policymakers wrestle with issues such as Mexico’s drug-related violence, comprehensive immigration reform, and bi-national trade in the current recession, this year’s Border Security Conference is coming at a critical time and promises to be very informative.”

“El Paso, the largest bi-national metroplex in the world, is where the many challenges and opportunities of the U.S.-Mexico border are most salient,” UTEP President Diana Natalicio said. The University of Texas at El Paso, with its border location, student demographics, academic programs, research infrastructure and productive relationships with educational institutions in Mexico, offers an ideal context to share perspectives and promote cross-border conversations on the many issues surrounding security in this border region. UTEP is pleased to continue contributing to this critically important dialogue.”

Now in its sixth year, the widely-attended Annual Border Security Conference in El Paso has featured top national security officials such as former DHS Secretary Michael Chertoff, former Director of National Intelligence Michael McConnell, former CIA Director Michael Hayden, FBI Director Robert Mueller, and many others. Congressman Silvestre Reyes helped establish the annual conference to bring together leaders from both the U.S. and Mexico to address the complex security challenges confronting border communities.

Interested media should send RSVP to Vincent Perez in the Office of Congressman Silvestre Reyes at vincent.perez@mail.house.gov or by phone at 202-225-4831.

6th Annual Border Security Conference: Fostering a 21st Century Relationship of Cooperation and Shared Responsibility
Undergraduate Learning Center, University of Texas at El Paso

(FINAL Agenda)

August 10, 2009

Undergraduate Learning Center, Room 106, UTEP

12:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. – Exhibit Hall Open (Lobby)

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. – Registration (Lobby)

1:30 p.m. – Welcome and Opening Remarks

Master of Ceremonies
Ricardo Blazquez
Executive Director, Center for Inter-American and Border Studies
The University of Texas at El Paso

Diana Natalicio Ph.D.
President
The University of Texas at El Paso

The Honorable Silvestre Reyes
Chairman, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
U.S. House of Representatives

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. – Remarks

R. Gil Kerlikowske (confirmed)
Director
Office of National Drug Control Policy

2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. – Panel 1 – The Merida Initiative: A Shared Responsibility To Confront Illicit Narcotics Trafficking

The Honorable Ciro D. Rodriguez (confirmed)
Member
U.S. House of Representatives

Alan Bersin (confirmed)
Assistant Secretary of International Affairs and Special Representative for Border Affairs
Department of Homeland Security

John Morton (confirmed)
Assistant Secretary for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
Department of Homeland Security

Howard Campbell Ph.D. (confirmed)
Professor, Sociology & Anthropology
The University of Texas at El Paso

Sigrid Arzt (confirmed)
Former National Security Advisor to the President of Mexico
Woodrow Wilson Center

3:45 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. – Panel 2 – Integrating Technology and Connecting Communities

*Private industry panelists provided by sponsoring organizations

Bernd “Bear” McConnell (confirmed)
Director, Interagency Coordination
NORAD and USNORTHERN COMMAND

Alan Bloodgood (confirmed)
Director, Homeland Security Solutions
Lockheed Martin

Mike Monteilh (confirmed)
Engineering Manager, National Communications and Homeland Security
General Dynamics

Ann Gates Ph.D. (confirmed)
Associate Vice President, Office of Research and Sponsored Projects
The University of Texas at El Paso

Tim Peters (confirmed)
Vice President, Global Security Systems
The Boeing Company

Curt Powell (confirmed)
Director, Border Security
Raytheon Company

John Thomas (confirmed)
General Manager, Operations Intelligence and Security Business Unit
SAIC

Phlemon (P.T.) Wright, Jr. (confirmed)
Operations Director
CSC

5:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. – Introductions

Diana Natalicio Ph.D.
President
The University of Texas at El Paso

The Honorable Silvestre Reyes
Chairman, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
U.S. House of Representatives

5:15 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. – Remarks

Ambassador Benito Andion (confirmed)
Coordinator of International Cooperation and Security
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Mexico

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. – Reception

August 11, 2009
Undergraduate Learning Center, Room 106, UTEP

7:30 a.m. – Breakfast (Lobby)

7:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Exhibit Hall Open (Lobby)

8:15 a.m. – Welcome and Opening Remarks

Master of Ceremonies
Ricardo Blazquez
Executive Director, Center for Inter-American and Border Studies
The University of Texas at El Paso

Diana Natalicio Ph.D.
President
The University of Texas at El Paso

The Honorable Silvestre Reyes
Chairman, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
U.S. House of Representatives

8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. – Panel 3 – Forming A Comprehensive Homeland Security Operation

The Honorable Harry Teague (confirmed)
Memeber of Congress – New Mexico 2nd District
United States House of Representatives

David Aguilar (confirmed)
Chief of the U.S. Border Patrol
U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Tom Padden (confirmed)
Deputy Director, Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force
Department of Justice

Joseph M. Arabit (confirmed)
Special Agent in Charge, El Paso Division
Drug Enforcement Agency

Ronnie Carter (confirmed)
Special Agent in Charge, Dallas Division
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

Douglas Watts Ph.D. (confirmed)
Executive Director, Institutional Biosafety and Veterinary Services
The University of Texas at El Paso

Miguel Escobedo, M.D., MPH (confirmed)
Quarantine Medical Officer
El Paso Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Quarantine

9:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Panel 4 – The Importance of Strengthening Civic Society, Commerce, and Academia

The Honorable Bob Filner (confirmed)
Chairman, U.S. House Veterans Affairs Committee – California 51st District
United States House of Representatives

Rodger Garner (confirmed)
Mission Director for Mexico
U.S. Agency for International Development
Department of State

Jose Reyes Ferriz (confirmed)
Mayor
Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Angelo Amador (confirmed)
Director of Immigration Policy
U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Kathleen Staudt Ph.D. (confirmed)
Professor, Political Science
The University of Texas at El Paso

11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. – Introductions

Diana Natalicio Ph.D.
President
The University of Texas at El Paso

The Honorable Silvestre Reyes
Chairman, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
U.S. House of Representatives

11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Remarks

The Honorable Janet Napolitano (confirmed)
Secretary
U.S. Department of Homeland Security

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. – Luncheon Speaker and Closing Remarks
(Tomás Rivera Conference Center, Union Building-East, 3rd fl., UTEP)

The Honorable Silvestre Reyes
Chairman, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
U.S. House of Representatives

The Honorable John Brennan (confirmed)
Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism
Office of the President

Advertisements

Written by newspapertreeelpaso

August 7, 2009 at 12:58 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

3 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. PR stunt, how many times does the issue have to be discussed ? This appears to be the place for politicians to be seen, for a boost in publicity.

    Rey

    August 9, 2009 at 1:18 pm

  2. While the El Paso Times says all arrestees will be checked may help debunk claims of racial profiling the danger is in thinking that IDENT and IAFIS is only used for criminal aliens…no longer is a smashed tail light or no seat belt stop to run the old NCIC check could enough, now jail and the booking room is needed to ‘get the bad guy’ so as the target can be run through the feds super computers, arrests for no seat belt as upheld by SCOTUS in the Austin Texas case will now help ‘check your man’ because the super computers are only at the jail and the ‘bad guy’ needs screening because the experienced police officer gut tells him so….thus the purpose of IDENT and IAFIS is not criminal aliens really, the purpose is you and me and Government Data Mining.

    Now jail is how you check someone for a smashed tail light, not the old NCIC radio check, only the jail booking room contains the feds super computer and thats where all the ‘bad guys’ are headed…ah uh not you and me….right? yea right.

    William Mitchell Law Review

    2008

    35 Wm. Mitchell L. Rev. 164

    Leveraging integration technology that shares law enforcement data between federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, ICE is now able to expand coverage nationwide in a cost effective manner. Interoperability between the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI’s) Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) and DHS’ Automated Biometric Identification System (IDENT) will help ICE and local law enforcement officers positively identify criminal aliens in prisons and jails.

    United States of America, Plaintiff, vs. Fidel Diaz-Quintana, Defendant.

    UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF NORTH DAKOTA, SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION

    596 F. Supp. 2d 1273; 2009 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 12018

    February 6, 2009, Decided

    order Patrol Agent Bane asserts in his affidavit that it was his intention to [**20] have Diaz-Quintana taken into administrative custody and to be processed administratively rather than criminally. Consequently, Diaz-Quintana was taken to the Stark County Law Enforcement Center in Dickinson and then to the Border Patrol station in Portal. Once in Portal, it was determined that Diaz-Quintana was in the United States illegally. At that time, he was placed under arrest. As established above, Diaz-Quintana was not under custodial arrest when he was transported to the [*1282] law enforcement center and then to the Border Patrol station. Instead, he was merely going through the administrative processing necessary to fully investigate his immigration status and to determine whether full custodial arrest was warranted. Thus, Diaz-Quintana was not subjected to a detention equivalent to formal arrest until after Agent Lotvedt learned of his criminal and immigration history, and placed him under arrest while at the Border Patrol station. Under the totality of the circumstances, the Court finds that Diaz-Quintana was not “in custody” for purposes of Miranda until he was placed under arrest at the Border Patrol station. A reasonable person would have considered the continued detention [**21] of Diaz-Quintana to be a mere extension of the traffic stop so that his immigration status could be determined. Therefore, the reading of Miranda rights was not required before this time and any evidence obtained prior to this point is admissible.

    Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review

    Summer, 2008

    43 Harv. C.R.-C.L. L. Rev. 435

    Government Data Mining: The Need for a Legal Framework

    NAME: Fred H. Cate*

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”) maintains extensive databases in its Criminal Justice Information Services Division (“CJISD”) that collect data from, and supply data to, a wide array of public-and private-sector [*443] entities. n35 For example, the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification Service (“IAFIS”) provides for automated data matching with three fingerprint databases containing 51 million records: the criminal history database; the civil file, containing records on individuals who have been required to submit fingerprints for employee background checks, security clearances, state licensure, and other non-criminal purposes; and the Unsolved Latent File, which includes fingerprints from crime scenes that could not be matched with either of the other databases. n36 The FBI’s Next Generation Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System will not only allow for faster data mining, but also allow matching of other biometric identifiers. n37

    The FBI already collects data on one of those additional biometric identifiers–DNA. The Bureau’s Combined DNA Index System (“CODIS”) includes separate databases for DNA collected from: convicted criminals, arrestees, and parolees; forensic profiles from crime scenes; unidentified human remains; and missing persons and their relatives. n38 CODIS interconnects state and local databases to facilitate faster data matching. The Bureau has announced plans to spend $ 1 billion to build a more comprehensive biometric database. n39

    56 Naval L. Rev. 87

    The Latent Print Unit of the FBI Laboratory initiated an Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System [hereinafter IAFIS] search in an attempt to match the latent prints received from Spain with known prints in the FBI computer system. n24 An automated system, IAFIS facilitated “computer searches of FBI databases containing the fingerprints of over 47 million individuals.” n25 At first, the FBI was unable to locate a fingerprint match. n26 Suspecting this failure to match was because the original images were of low resolution, the FBI requested that SNP send higher resolution digital photographs of the latent prints. n27 These were received on March 14, 2004, including the now infamous print which set the Mayfield case in motion. This print was identified as Latent Finger Print Number 17 [hereinafter LFP 17]. n28

    On March 15, using the new images, the FBI performed another IAFIS search through several databases. n29 The FBI technicians programmed the computer to return up to twenty candidates whose known prints had features in common with each latent print. n30 The computer produced twenty candidates for LFP 17 that met the criteria. n31 Each candidate was identified by an IAFIS score, a number that reflected a rank as to how closely the IAFIS computer matched each candidate’s fingerprint to certain features of LFP 17. n32 According to the DOJ, “[t]he candidate print that receives the highest score from the computer may not be the true match, which is why the system generates a list of candidate prints rather than just the highest-scoring candidate.

    Carl Starr

    August 11, 2009 at 10:20 am

  3. I ment to post this from the above case…

    point being, jail…arrest, becomes the way to check the av citizen, only jail will legally extend the stop for a smashed tail light, no longer is a five minute ticket with a ncic check good enough, only the booking room contains the feds linked super database

    It is undisputed that Diaz-Quintana was detained for an extended period of time — approximately twenty-four hours — while his immigration status was being investigated. However, obvious exigencies existed as the law enforcement officers attempted to determine Diaz-Quintana’s immigration status. Diaz-Quintana was first transported to the Stark County Law Enforcement [*1280] Center in Dickinson, North Dakota, after the initial traffic stop so that a Border Patrol official could take custody of him. Agent Lotvedt had to travel more than 200 miles from the Border Patrol station in Portal, North Dakota, to pick up Diaz-Quintana, and then had to transport Diaz-Quintana back to the Border Patrol station. The Government explains that it was necessary to transport Diaz-Quintana to the Border Patrol station because that is the location of “IDENT,” “an automated identification system [**15] that records a digital print from the index finger of each hand and a digital photograph of each illegal entrant over 14 who is apprehended by Border Patrol agents or other immigration officer[s].” See Docket No. 26. These unique circumstances required a longer period of detention to determine Diaz-Quintana’s immigration status.

    Carl Starr

    August 11, 2009 at 10:39 am


Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: